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drones to a green fleet, i expect similar policies to continue for my former colleague chuck hagel to be confirmed, hopefully as early as next week. for all these reasons i have long been a supporter of renewable fuels, and i encourage the further development of an industry that is important, both to our national security as well as to our farm economy. whether we're talking food or water or energy security, let me put it this way. in the future, more crops in the field can mean fewer soldiers in the field. at the same time, as important as our defense capabilities are, we also need to rebalance for the other free d's. the u.s. today spends more on defense than on diplomacy, democracy and developments all put together. meanwhile, in the past year, china has more than doubled its investment in developing new agricultural technologies. those are the kinds of farsighted policies that are enabling china to emerge as a world power, in which we, frankly, need to get back to. as we shift our focus and our resources towards smarter, more constructive forms of international interaction, it'
-level officers and enlisted that are so important to the leadership of our military and chuck hagel's leadership and commitment will be critical to that task. i have met with chuck hagel privately, i've asked him tough questions about iran and israel. i'm satisfied on those points that he will advise the president in according to with -- in accord with those policies but even more important i am struck by his passion, the intensity of his commitment to our men and women in uniform. his caring about them is indicated in so many ways. spontaneously and strongly in his testimony, as well as his private conversations. he will make sure that sexual assault in the military, the epidemic and scourge of rape and assault against men and women who serve and sacrifice for this country will be stopped, that there will be, in fact, zero tolerance not only in word but in deed. and his viewing, for example, of the documentary "invisible war," his understanding that this kind of misconduct is an outrage never to be even implicitly condoned and to be treated as a criminal offense, the most extreme kind of predat
. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate hereby move to br
. but sometimes i read in the newspapers that republicans are filibustering, for example senator hagel as if a majority of republicans or a majority of the senate intended to deny the nomination to senator hagel through a filibuster, when in fact what most of the republicans were saying was the nomination of the former senator has come to the floor only two days ago. we have senators who got legitimate questions about the nomination and we'd like some time to discuss it. in that case we were forced to have a vote on a motion by the majority leader to cut off debate on thursday before the recess even though the democratic leadership and the white house had been told by republican senators, enough of us, that if we voted after the recess there would be plenty of votes to make sure that the president's nominee had an up-or-down vote, as we have done throughout history in the united states senate. for whatever reason, the majority leader and the white house felt that they had to push through a vote and then went into a large complaint that republicans are filibustering the president's nomi
on whaif of the chairman of the atlantic counsel, senator chuck hagel, our president and ceo fred, it's my pleasure to welcome you here this afternoon for this discussion on managing the the crisis in mali. before enter deucing today's topic, let me say a word about the council of the african center for the benefit of the audience those who are new or joining us for the first time joining us via the television or internet. the africa center was established in september of 2009 with the mission to help transform u.s. and european policy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong, geopolitical partnership with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity. the center seeks to engage in form with policy makers in the general public with the strategic pornts of africa globally and more fern and european interest in particular, a subject which obviously you share with us by joining us today. the strategic importance. we do this to programs and publications as well as a robust immediate jay presence. within the context of the atlantic council's work to product -
generals and our acting secretary of defense, secretary hagel now concur with. so we're okay with defense, and most of all the military is okay with it. then we also cut domestic spending. here we cut $27 billion, cuts in the farm bill. it eliminates subsidies that we don't need to do anymore. the presiding officer is from an agricultural state. we love your cheese. we even from time to time cheer on the green bay packers, but -- from time to time. but at the same time -- so we know agriculture is important, but essentially we have a tax subsidy structure that goes back to the 1930's. a different economy, a dust bowl, people vacating homes in oklahoma and following the grapes of wrath trail to california. so we came up through the new deal a way of subsidizing farms, restoring the land and restoring people to their land. but a lot of those subsidies aren't needed anymore, and quite frankly a lot of it goes to agribusiness for crops we don't even plant. so working with the agriculture committee, the appropriations didn't just do this out of the blue. we come up with $27.5 billion. now, muc
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6